1887
Proceedings of the 24th World International Traffic Medicine Association Congress, Qatar 2015
  • ISSN: 2223-0440
  •  E-ISSN:  Will be obtained soon

Abstract

Qatar is one of the 20 countries of the IDF MENA region. Three hundred and eighty seven million people have diabetes worldwide and more than 37 million people in the MENA Region; by 2035 this will rise to 68 million. There were 303,700 cases of diabetes in Qatar in 2014. Large number of diabetic patients will seek or currently hold a license to drive. Most of these patients are either on oral medications or insulin to control their diabetes. Hypoglycemia is one of the major complications related to diabetes treatment. Many large studies have shown an increased risk of hypoglycemia with tight blood sugar control. Unfortunately most diabetes medication can cause hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia has been associated with cardiac arrhythmia, a decreased ability to drive and driving mishap. Recent meta-analysis of 15 studies showed a risk road traffic collisions (RTC) of 12-19% greater than general populations. The most significant subgroup of persons with diabetes is those on insulin therapy. The single most significant factor associated with RTC appears to be history of recent severe hypoglycemia. Government regulations have not been established in most of GSC and MENA in general. All EU countries do have regulations for diabetes and driving. Many US states have a restrictive license program for drivers with medical conditions including diabetes. These regulations include more frequent medical examination to denial of driving license, e.g.in those patients with hypoglycemia unawareness. Also more restriction regulations have been established for drivers who are using insulin and buses and heavy goods trucks.

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/content/journals/10.5339/jlghs.2015.itma.73
2015-11-12
2020-05-30
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  • Article Type: Research Article
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