1887
Volume 2014, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 2223-0440
  • EISSN:

Abstract

In recent decades the Ingessana Hills, namely the Bao and Jam areas located in the Southwest of the Blue Nile State in Sudan, have been very important areas due to their mining activities. By releasing bio-monitoring systems we can facilitate extensive evaluation of environmental hazards and their impact on human health. Measurement of the levels of mineral elements traces in villagers' blood samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy and the automated haematology analyser, then comparing them with the control samples taken from the Khartoum State (which has no mining activities). The concentrations of chromium, iron, copper, and cobalt residuals in blood were evaluated regarding sex and location. We found that chromium and iron in the three different areas was P < 0.05, iron values were found to be within the normal ranges. Serum level of chromium in the Jam area population was P < 0.05, copper and cobalt were P>0.05; and the values were found to be in normal reference range, except for chromium which was found to be slightly increased in Jam area. Sex has no influence on chromium, copper and cobalt, but iron was higher in males than females (P>0.05). The haematological values of red blood cells, white blood cells, haemoglobin and packed cell volume were P>0.05 in the Bao and Jam areas. These values among sex groups did not show significant differences except for haemoglobin, which was found to be higher in male groups. The study confirmed that people who reside in the Jam area are exposed to high levels of chromium. This may occur through many routes of exposure, including drinking water (ground water), ingesting food enriched with chromium, or by inhaling dust or fumes that come from chromium mineralisation companies.

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2014-09-01
2020-11-25
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): Bio-monitoring , community health , mining , serum , Sudan and trace elements
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