1887
Volume 2016, Issue 2
  • E-ISSN: 2223-506X

Abstract

Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a resourceful technology that offers a large selection of solutions that are readily adaptable to tissue engineering of artificial heart valves (HVs). Different deposition techniques could be used to produce complex architectures, such as the three-layered architecture of leaflets. Once the assembly is complete, the growth of cells in the scaffold would enable the deposition of cell-specific extracellular matrix proteins. 3D printing technology is a rapidly evolving field that first needs to be understood and then explored by tissue engineers, so that it could be used to create efficient scaffolds. On the other hand, to print the HV scaffold, a basic understanding of the fundamental structural and mechanical aspects of the HV should be gained. This review is focused on alginate that can be used as a building material due to its unique properties confirmed by the successful application of alginate-based biomaterials for the treatment of myocardial infarction in humans. Within the field of biomedicine, there is a broad scope for the application of alginate including wound healing, cell transplantation, delivery of bioactive agents, such as chemical drugs and proteins, heat burns, acid reflux, and weight control applications. The non-thrombogenic nature of this polymer has made it an attractive candidate for cardiac applications, including scaffold fabrication for heart valve tissue engineering (HVTE). The next essential property of alginate is its ability to form films, fibers, beads, and virtually any shape in a variety of sizes. Moreover, alginate possesses several prime properties that make it suitable for use in free-form fabrication techniques. The first property is its ability, when dissolved, to increase the viscosity of aqueous solutions, which is particularly important in formulating extrudable mixtures for 3D printing. The second property is its ability to form gels in mild conditions, for example, by adding calcium salt to an aqueous solution of alginate. The latter property is a basis for reactive extrusion- and inkjet printing-based solid free-form fabrication. Both techniques enable the production of scaffolds for cell encapsulation, which increases the seeding efficiency of fabricated structures. The objective of this article is to review methods for the fabrication of alginate hydrogels in the context of HVTE.

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2016-04-13
2019-11-20
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  • Article Type: Review Article
Keyword(s): Alginate , Heart Valve , Hydrogels , living threads , Three-dimensional printing and Tissue Engineering
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