1887

Abstract

Students with a learning disability (LD) comprise between 46 to 61% of all students with disabilities in postsecondary education, making LD the most widely diagnosed disability. Very often LD has a significant negative impact for those college students in both their academic work and interpersonal encounters due to frequent misunderstandings and unawareness by faculty, staff, and fellow students. To address the challenges of LD, the University of Florida is developing and implementing a unique model of multifaceted approaches and services for these students in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics), called Comprehensive Support for STEM Students with Learning Disability (CS3LD). We form a cohort of students with LD (CS3LD scholar) who are mentored and supported in the areas of academics, health, personal and professional development. Simultaneously, we build a campus network of health and STEM units/personnel sensitive to and able to address the needs of STEM students with LD. Grounded in Social Cognitive Theory, this approach is designed to impact the student (personal), encounters (interpersonal), and our campus environment (institutional). At the personal level, mechanisms for CS3LD scholar engagement are designed to foster self-advocacy, self-efficacy, and increased campus connection and participation. Scholar activities include individual mentorships, group activities, and student-driven project initiatives. At the interpersonal level, multi-disciplinary mentorship teams are designed for each CS3LD scholar to improve mentoring and professional enculturation to STEM disciplines for students with LD. Mentorship teams address individual academic and disability/health related needs. At the institutional level, a campus-wide network of health and STEM faculty, staff, graduate students, and academic units knowledgeable of LD is created to coordinate efforts in facilitating the success of STEM students with LD. A Partnership Council is created to increase communication and examine ways to better meet the needs of students with LD on campus. The Partnership Council includes faculty representatives from academic and health units across the University of Florida (UF) campus, as well as CS3LD scholar representatives who contribute student perspectives to the conversation.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/papers/10.5339/qproc.2015.elc2014.70
2015-08-29
2019-10-17
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/qproc/2015/4/qproc.2015.elc2014.70.html?itemId=/content/papers/10.5339/qproc.2015.elc2014.70&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. [1]. NCLD . Learning Disability Fast Facts . Sep 21, 2014; ; . Available: http://ncld.org/types-learning-disabilities/what-is-ld/learning-disability-fast-facts .
    [Google Scholar]
  2. [2]. Murray   C., , Goldstein   DE., , Nourse   S., , Edgar   E. . The postsecondary school attendance and completion rates of high school graduates with learning disabilities. . Learn. Disabil. Res. Pract.   2000; ;15: : 119– 127 .
    [Google Scholar]
  3. [3]. Quick   D., , Lehmann   J., , Deniston   T. . Opening doors for students with disabilities on community college campuses: What have we learned? What do we still need to know?.   Community Coll. J. Res. Pract.   2003; ;27: : 815– 827 .
    [Google Scholar]
  4. [Google Scholar]
  5. [5]. Love   D. . 15 CEOs With Learning Disabilities . October 2, 2011; ; . Available: http://www.businessinsider.com/ceo-learning-disabilities-2011-5?op = 1 .
    [Google Scholar]
  6. [6]. Chemers   MM., , Hu   L-T., , Garcia   BF. . Academic self-efficacy and first year college student performance and adjustment. . J. Educ. Psychol.   2001; ;93: : 55 .
    [Google Scholar]
  7. [7]. Kennett   DJ., , Keefer   K. . Impact of learned resourcefulness and theories of intelligence on academic achievement of university students: An integrated approach. . Educ. Psychol.   2006; ;26: : 441– 457 .
    [Google Scholar]
  8. [8]. Perry   RP., , Hladkyj   S., , Pekrun   RH., , Clifton   RA., , Chipperfield   JG. . Perceived academic control and failure in college students: A three-year study of scholastic attainment. . Res. Higher Educ.   2005; ;46: : 535– 569 .
    [Google Scholar]
  9. [9]. Zajacova   A., , Lynch   SM., , Espenshade   TJ. . “Self-efficacy, stress, and academic success in college,” Res. . Higher Educ.   2005; ;46: : 677– 706 .
    [Google Scholar]
  10. [10]. Reiff   HB., , Hatzes   NM., , Bramel   MH., , Gibbon   T. . The relation of LD and gender with emotional intelligence in college students. . J. Learn. Disabil . 2001; ;34: : 66– 78 .
    [Google Scholar]
  11. [11]. Bandura   A. . Self-efficacy: the exercise of control . New York: : W.H. Freeman;   1997; .
    [Google Scholar]
  12. [12]. LaFrance   EDB. . The gifted/dyslexic child: Characterizing and addressing strengths and weaknesses. . Ann. Dyslexia . 1997; ;47: : 163– 182 .
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/papers/10.5339/qproc.2015.elc2014.70
Loading
/content/papers/10.5339/qproc.2015.elc2014.70
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error