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Abstract

Management of production from gas reservoirs can be a challenging process. The challenge gets bigger when the reservoir is characterized by having a small pore size, such as the tight carbonate reservoirs which are prominent in this part of the world. In such conditions, condensate blockage becomes a real threat to productivity. Carbon dioxide can be injected into the reservoir to combat this threat. We built a reservoir model to conduct a simulation study with the goal of finding the most feasible method for overcoming the negative impact of condensate formation. We have attempted to simulate huff-n-puff enhanced gas recovery in the same reservoir model, but this method did not achieve much success in alleviating the damage caused by condensate blockage. As a result, according to the model and data we collected, using huff-n-puff is not efficient since it failed to maintain the average reservoir pressure as well as CO2 did, therefore peripheral CO2 injection have been tested. The minimum requirement again is to achieve gas plateau production, while also maximizing the condensate recovery and minimizing the CO2 breakthrough into the wells. It was decided that seven CO2 injector wells were to be placed at strategic locations (injectors have been planned to be drilled away from the reservoir and producing wells) across the field in order to enhance the sweeping of condensate as well as minimize CO2 breakthrough. In other words, the injectors had to be at a distance where it can achieve all our simulation objectives. We ended up understanding the effect of the CO2 injection on condensate formation. As a result, it could be notice how the saturation of oil is high near the producing end of the core, this kind of saturation can completely nullify the relative permeability of gas, whereas after using CO2 flooding, the saturation is decreased significantly and the amount of condensate throughout the core is also much less.

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/content/papers/10.5339/qfarc.2014.EEPP1097
2014-11-18
2020-07-11
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http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/papers/10.5339/qfarc.2014.EEPP1097
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