1887
Volume 2023, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0253-8253
  • EISSN: 2227-0426

Abstract

Introduction: Pregnant women are considered a high-risk group for COVID-19 due to their increased vulnerability to viral infections. The impact of COVID-19 on pregnant women is not well understood, and there is a need for data on managing severe COVID-19 in pregnant patients. This retrospective descriptive cohort study described the characteristics, hospital stay, interventions, and outcomes of pregnant patients admitted to the intensive care units (ICUs) with severe COVID-19 pneumonia in Qatar.

Methods: Data were collected from medical records and chart reviews of pregnant women admitted to Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC) with COVID-19 pneumonia from March 01, 2020, to July 31, 2021. The inclusion criteria encompassed pregnant women with a positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) antigen test or radiological changes at admission, requiring respiratory support, and hospitalized for more than 24 hours.

Results: A total of 43 pregnant women were included in this study. Most patients were admitted during the first wave of the pandemic, with a median gestational age of 212 days [interquartile range 178–242 days] at presentation. The most common respiratory support methods were high-flow nasal cannula, non-invasive positive pressure ventilation, and invasive positive pressure ventilation. Convalescent plasma therapy was administered to 58% of patients, and tocilizumab was used in 28%. Renal replacement therapy was required by 4.6% of patients and 7% required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

Conclusion: This study provides valuable insights into the impact of COVID-19 on pregnant patients admitted to the ICUs in Qatar. The results suggest that pregnant patients with COVID-19 pneumonia require close monitoring and appropriate interventions to minimize adverse outcomes for both mother and fetus. The data may contribute to future guidelines and management strategies for severe COVID-19 in pregnant patients.

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2023-09-24
2024-07-23
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