1887
Volume 2021, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0253-8253
  • EISSN: 2227-0426

Abstract

Background: Depression and anxiety are major health problems found to be associated with various conditions. COVID-19 is a global pandemic that has a substantial effect on the worldwide population. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of depression and anxiety among male patients with COVID-19 and explore their relationship with participants’ characteristics.

Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among expatriate male patients with COVID-19 admitted to Lebsayyer Field Hospital in Qatar with mild COVID-19 (according to World Health Organization classification) from July till August 2020. The sample size was calculated using Cochran's formula based on disease prevalence. All eligible patients were invited to participate until reaching 400 participants, who then completed an anonymous survey of sociodemographic questions, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 questionnaire, which are validated screening tools for depression and anxiety, respectively.

Results: Of the 400 participants, 148 (37.0%) and 77 (19.3%) reported depressive and anxiety symptoms, respectively. Depression was more prevalent among those 40–49 years old ( = 0.029), while anxiety was more prevalent among people aged  ≥ 50 ( = 0.456). Both depression ( = 0.009) and anxiety ( = 0.042) were more prevalent among Bangladeshi, followed by Filipino participants. Depression was more prevalent among those with the highest income (> 15,000 QR;  = 0.004), in contrast to anxiety, which was more prevalent among those with the lowest monthly income ( <  2,000 QR;  = 0.039).

Conclusion: The prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms is high among the study participants. Associated factors identified by the study were unsteady income, poor self-rated health, living with family, Southeast Asian ethnicity, and age group of 40–49 years.

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2021-12-01
2022-06-30
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