1887
Volume 2011, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 0253-8253
  • E-ISSN: 2227-0426

Abstract

There is a growing awareness that Vitamin D sufficiency is required for optimal health during all stages of life. Inadequate Vitamin D status is increasingly recognized as common problem. To assess the serum level of 25 Hydroxyvitamin D 250 HD among healthy post-menopausal Qatari women living in Doha a crosssection randomized study of 205 post-menopausal Qatari women was conducted between 1 September 2008 and 31 April 2009 at four Primary Health Care Centers. Using interviews, a questionnaire, and a 5 ml blood sample, personal data was collected plus likely risk factors for Vitamin D insufficiency. More than onethird of the women (38.0%) had severe Vitamin D deficiency, almost half (47.3%) had mild Vitamin D deficiency, only 14.6% had a normal Vitamin D level. Risk factors were inadequate exposure to the sun, the use of sun screen, complete covering of the body with clothing, low dietary Vitamin D intake and the use of Vitamin D supplements. The study indicated clearly that hypovitaminosis D is common in post-menopausal Qatari women and that efforts are required to encourage adequate exposure to sunlight and an increased intake of fortified Vitamin D to maintain normal levels.

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2011-12-01
2019-12-13
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): insufficiency , post-menopausal , Qatar and Vitamin D
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