1887
Volume 2006, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 0253-8253
  • E-ISSN: 2227-0426

Abstract

Background: Obesity should be recognized as a primary medical condition that is progressive, chronic and relaps-ing. Simply, obesity refers to an excess of body fat or adi-posity. The aim of this study is to explore some variables of social aspect of Iraqi obese.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in four medical centers in Baghdad city from 15th October 2002 through February 2003. A sample of (400) adult obese aged (20-60)years of both sexes with inclusion and exclu-sion criteria was studied. A socio-demography data were collected by direct interview technique. Height and weight were measured, Body mass index (BMI) was calculated and subject of 30kg/m2 and more were considered as obese. Obese were classified into three classes.

Results: The peak of obesity (34%) was found at age (40-49) years. BMI distribution significantly associated with educational level of male but not of female. Marital state showed significant relationship with different classes of obesity for female but not for male. Obesity has no sig-nificant association with social relationships. The feeling of social acceptance was strongly associated with the de-gree of obesity. There was a significant difference between both sexes in their trials for dieting.

Conclusion: Both sexes of different age groups are affected with increased prevalence in middle age group. Obese have ordinary social relationship with others and a normal sexual relationship with partners. The obese con-sider obesity as being unwanted or dangerous status, still their trials to lose weight are not convincing. There are many barriers for not exercising in Iraqi obese.

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