1887
Volume 2005, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 0253-8253
  • E-ISSN: 2227-0426

Abstract

To study the antimicrobial resistance pattern of aerobic Gram-negative bacilli isolated from patients in intensive care units in Hamad Medical Corporation, 108 non-duplicate isolates from 60 patients with nosocomial infections were determined by Vitek machine. The minimal inhibitory concentration of 14 antimicrobials was determined by E-test and results were interpreted according to the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards guidelines. The most common species was Pseudomonas aeruginosa High levels of resistance were seen to second and third generation cephalosporins, piperacillin, fi-lactam Ji-lactamase inhibitors combinations, and gentamicin. The most active agents were amikacin, meropenem and imipenem (resistance 19%, 19%, 20% respectively). We conclude that second and third generation cephalosporins, piperacillin, fi-lactam/fi-lactamase inhibitors combinations and gentamicin are not suitable drugs for empirical monotherapy for aerobic Gram-negative infections in intensive care units in Qatar.

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2005-06-01
2019-12-05
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): bacterial resistance , gram negative bacteria and Intensive care units
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