1887
Volume 2003, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 0253-8253
  • E-ISSN: 2227-0426

Abstract

The objective of this study was to explore the prevailing complications of diabetes mellitus and to explore some of the associated factors among Qatari patients previously diagnosed as having diabetes mellitus. A random sample of Qatari diabetic patients attending outpatient clinics (8 am to 12 pm) attached to Hamad General Hospital, between May 2001-2002 were included in the study. The total sample was 225, 74 males, and 151 females. The results revealed that retinopathy was the most prevailing complication (43.6%), followed by nephropathy (40.9%), hypertension (36.9%), neuropathy (28.9%), hyperlipidemia (26.7%), coronary heart disease (18.7%), foot ulcer (4.4%), and thyroid problems (3.6%). A significant association between development of hypertension and high body mass index (BMI) was found. Neuropathy and thyroid problems were significantly higher in females. (56.9%) of the patients were obese (BMI >30 kg/m2), and 28.9% were overweight (BMI 25-29.9). Two thirds of the patients had positive family history of the disease, and females who had diabetic fathers were significantly higher than males.

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2019-12-06
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