1887
Volume 2015, Issue 1
  • E-ISSN: 1703-1958

Abstract

While numerous studies have been conducted on the impact of nicknames on students, these studies have focused on the effects of nicknames students have received in their lives. This study adopted a very unique and different design and asked female Kuwaiti university students to self-select a nickname of their own choice to be used in the classroom instead of their proper name. The students who volunteered to self-select nicknames and the students who did not were administered a structured questionnaire that was designed to gather data regarding the perceptions of the effects the self-selected nicknames had upon classroom performance. The analysis of the surveys revealed that the female students who selected nicknames reported that it improved their classroom performance. In addition, the females who did not select a nickname reported that it appeared to improve the classroom performance of those who choose a nickname.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.5339/nmejre.2015.2
2015-07-08
2019-12-13
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/nmejre/2015/1/nmejre.2015.2.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.5339/nmejre.2015.2&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Aceto M. Ethnic personal names and multiple identities in Anglophone Caribbean speech communities in Latin America. Language in Society. 2002; 31:04:577608.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Ames R. Help-seeking and achievement orientation: Perspectives from attribution theory. In: DePaulo BNadler AFisher JD. New directions in helping, v2. New York: Academic Press 1983;:165186.
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Anderson CP. The name game. New York: Perigree 1986.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Berger A. An anatomy of humor. New Brunswick, N.J: Transaction Publishers 1993.
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Butkus A. An outline and classification of Lithuanian nicknames. Names: A Journal of Onomastics. 1999; 457:2:125138.
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Crosier WR, Dimmock PS. Name-calling and nicknames in a sample of primary school children. British Journal of Educational Psychology. 1999; 69:4:505516.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. de Klerk V, Bosch B. Nicknames as sex-role stereotypes. Sex Roles. 1996; 35:10:525541.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Dollinger A. An introduction to the history and culture of Pharaonic Egypt. 2006; Childhood in Ancient Egypt: Birth, growing up, education, death. Retrieved Jan, 5, 2012, from http://nefertitit.iwebland.com/people/childhood.htm .
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Drannikova N. The local-group nicknames of the Russian North: Functionality and context. Prace Komiski Jezykoznawcze,j. 2006; 45::1931.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Eliasson MA, Laflamme L, Isaksoon K, Verbal abuse, gender and well-being at school, International Journal of Adolescent Medical Health. 2005; 17:4:367378.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Fernandez C. Sociolinguistics patterns in onomastics. Revista Espanola de Lingustica. 2008; 38:2:520.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. GottFried A. Academic intrinsic motivation in young elementary school children. Journal of Educational Psychology. 1990; 82:3:525538.
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Haggan M. Nicknames of Kuwaiti teenagers. Names. 2008; 56:2:8194.
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Harter S. The perceived competence scale for children. Child Development. 1982; 53::8797.
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Kuranchie A. Student's nicknames: Their sources and effects on learning. Journal of Education and Practice. 2012; 3:14:126132.
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Kepenekci Yasemin K, Sakir Cinkir. Bullying among Turkish high school students. Child Abuse and Neglect. 2006; 30:2:193204.
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Kiesling SF. Power and the language of men. In: Johnson SMeinhof UH, eds. Language and Masculinity. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell 1996;:334350.
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Kolawole KA, Otuyemi OD, Adeosun OD. Nicknames and name calling among a population of Nigerian schoolchildren. European Journal of Pediatric Dentistry. 2009; 10:3:115120.
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Koss G. Nicknames: Variation and internal differentiation in a linguistic field. Beitrage zur Nameforschung. 2006; 41:1:112.
    [Google Scholar]
  20. Liao C. A sociolinguistic study of Taiwan-Chinese personal names, nicknames, andEnglish names. Taipei: Crane 2000.
    [Google Scholar]
  21. Liao C. Linguistic analysis of nicknames of junior high school students. Taiwan: National University of Kaohsiung 2006.
    [Google Scholar]
  22. Marsh HW. Content specificity of relations between academic achievement and academic self-concept. Journal of Educational Psychology. 1992; 84::3542.
    [Google Scholar]
  23. Mehrabian A, Piercy M. Differences in positive and negative connotations of nicknames and given names. The Journal of Social Psychology. 1993; 33::737739.
    [Google Scholar]
  24. Morgan J, O'Neil C, Harre R. Nicknames: Their origins and social consequences. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul 1979.
    [Google Scholar]
  25. Molefe L. Onomastic aspects of Zulu nicknames with special reference to source and Functionality. (Doctoral dissertation). University of South Africa, Pretoria), 2001.
    [Google Scholar]
  26. Orbach M. Hunters, seamen and entrepreneurs. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press 1977.
    [Google Scholar]
  27. Phillips BS. Nicknames and sex role stereotypes. Sex Roles. 1990; 23:5:281289.
    [Google Scholar]
  28. Smith EC. Treasury of name lore. New York: Harper and Row 1967.
    [Google Scholar]
  29. Skaalvik EM, Rankin RJ. Studies of Academic Self-Concept Using a Norwegian Modification of the SDQ. Paper presented at the XXVI International Congress of Psychology, Montreal, Canada, 1996.
    [Google Scholar]
  30. Skinner EA, Wellborn J, Connell J. What it takes to do well in school and whether I've got it: A process model of perceived control and children's engagement and achievement in school. Journal of Educational Psychology. 1990; 82::2272.
    [Google Scholar]
  31. Sudnman S, Bradburn NM, Schwarz N. Thinking about answers: The application of cognitive processes to survey methodology. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass 1996.
    [Google Scholar]
  32. Thornborrow J. Language and identity. In: Thomas et al. . Language, society and power. An Introduction. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul 2004;:135149.
    [Google Scholar]
  33. Trice HM. Occupational subcultures in the workplace. Ithaca, NY: ILR Press 1993.
    [Google Scholar]
  34. Trice HM, Beyer JM. The cultures of work organizations. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall 1993.
    [Google Scholar]
  35. Wardat M. Nicknaming in Jordanian Arabic: A sociolinguistic perspective. Interface. 1997; 12:1:4548.
    [Google Scholar]
  36. Wilson KJ. Icelandic nicknames. (Doctoral dissertation, University of California, 2007). Retrieved from ProQuest Dissertations and Theses. (Accession Order No. AAT 3306387) Dissertation Abstracts International , 2008.
    [Google Scholar]
  37. Wilson S. The means of naming: A social and cultural history of personal naming in Western Europe. London: University College London 1998.
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.5339/nmejre.2015.2
Loading
  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): classroom performance , Kuwaiti , learning , Nicknames and self-selected nicknames
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error