1887
2 - Unified National Conference of Iraqi Dental Colleges (UNCIDC)
  • ISSN: 1999-7086
  • EISSN: 1999-7094

Abstract

This study investigates the factors contributing to self-medication among elderly patients in TIU (Tishk International University) and Erbil Infirmary House, utilizing a mixed-methods approach that combines qualitative interviews and quantitative surveys.

The sample includes elderly patients aged 60 years and above with diverse backgrounds, employing a mixed-methods approach consisting of qualitative interviews and quantitative surveys. The study identifies several factors contributing to self-medication, such as limited access to healthcare, financial constraints, long waiting times, lack of trust in healthcare professionals, family influence, and positive past experiences with self-medication.

The study emphasizes the necessity for targeted interventions to address self-medication in the elderly. This includes improving healthcare access, reducing financial barriers, enhancing healthcare professionals’ communication skills, and educating patients on the risks and benefits of self-medication. Collaboration between providers and the elderly population is crucial for creating a safe environment for appropriate medication use.

The study reveals significant differences in self-medication behavior among the elderly based on demographic factors. Males were more likely to engage in self-medication, and the prevalence was higher among single elderly individuals. Primary education was more prevalent than high school or college education. There was no significant difference in self-medication prevalence between those without medical insurance and those with insurance. The presence of drug information significantly influenced self-medication practices.

Further research is needed to explore the long-term consequences of self-medication and evaluate the effectiveness of intervention strategies in mitigating associated risks. Addressing self-medication among elderly patients is essential to ensure their health and well-being.

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/content/journals/10.5339/jemtac.2024.uncidc.9
2024-02-13
2024-07-20
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Keyword(s): drugelderly people and Self-medication
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