1887
Volume 2023, Issue 4
  • ISSN: 1999-7086
  • EISSN: 1999-7094

Abstract

Envenomation caused by snakebites and scorpion stings is a neglected disease responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. In Qatar, little information is available on the epidemiological aspects of snakebites and scorpion stings. This study describes the demographic and epidemiological characteristics of patients treated for scorpion stings or snakebites at Qatar’s Primary Health Care Corporation (PHCC).

A retrospective data analysis was applied to investigate the number of scorpion stings and snakebites reported at the PHCC health centers between January 1, 2018, and December 31, 2022. The data were electronically extracted from the medical records of the registered population at PHCC.

581 scorpion stings and 21 cases of snakebites were reported between January 1, 2018, and December 31, 2022. The highest number of scorpion stings reported in 2020 was 141 cases. The distribution of scorpion stings was higher among males than females, with rates of 86% and 14%, respectively, and the highest number of cases occurred in the age group of 19–39 years. Among the total cases, Bangladeshi and Qatari were the most affected, with a rate of 41% and 14%, respectively. The western region had the highest incidence of scorpion stings, at 7.47 per 10,000 persons.

According to this research, the western region had the highest occurrence of scorpion stings cases, primarily among Bangladeshis and Qataris, particularly in the age group of 19–49 years. This study also found similar patterns in snakebite cases. Consequently, this study emphasizes the need for increased investment in antivenom and the training of healthcare professionals to address scorpion stings effectively.

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2023-10-04
2024-07-15
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