1887
Volume 2022 Number 3
  • ISSN: 1999-7086
  • EISSN: 1999-7094

Abstract

Vaccination proved useful in the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection; however, there were instances of breakthrough infection occurred. Unvaccinated people are liable to have a severe infection while infection in vaccinated people has different outcomes, especially in relation to the type of vaccine. In this study, we aimed to assess the severity of the disease in unvaccinated people and the severity of break through infection in vaccinated people in relation to the type of vaccines available in Iraq. Two groups of Iraqi patients were studied, of which the first included 8,096 patients with COVID-19 pneumonia, including their vaccination status; and the second group included 1,124 patients who received the vaccine and developed the disease later. The severity of infection in these groups in relation to the three types of vaccine administered in Iraq was evaluated. Among the 8,096 patients who developed severe and critical COVID-19 pneumonia, most (96%) were not vaccinated. Among 1,124 patients who received the vaccine and developed breakthrough infection, Sinovac was associated with mild cases while Pfizer and AstraZeneca were associated with moderate and severe cases. Infection in unvaccinated people tended to be more severe and critical than that in vaccinated people, where it was mild or moderate. Of the vaccines given in Iraq, Sinopharm appeared to be superior to the other two in terms of breakthrough infection.

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2022-07-14
2022-08-15
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Keyword(s): AstraZenecaCOVID-19PfizerSinopharm and vaccination
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