1887
Volume 2020, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 1999-7086
  • EISSN: 1999-7094

Abstract

The World Health Organization (WHO) and member countries aimed to eliminate measles by 2020. In 1997, the Regional Committee for the Eastern Mediterranean (EMR) had unanimously adopted a resolution for measles elimination reduction goals for the interruption of measles transmission in EMR countries by 2010.1,2,3 Among Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries of the Eastern Mediterranean Region of WHO, Oman and Bahrain accomplished this goal and were certified. However, those countries noted a resurgence of measles cases in 2018–2019 and integrated measles-related goals in their health plans beyond 2020. Documentation of GCC countries’ achievements and setbacks from 2015 to 2019 was conducted with data from WHO, UNICEF, and published related literature. An analysis of underlying factors, such as gross domestic product per capita, the ratio of nationals to expatriate population, seasonal reporting of measles, and their relation to the achievements, limitations, and subsequent challenges of the last five years in these countries are described. The lessons learned in GCC countries included heightened national commitment toward measles elimination, surveillance, allocation of dedicated human resources, and adept public health strategies, which could help professionals worldwide to realign their strategies and reset the goals for elimination of measles.

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2021-02-17
2021-07-31
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  • Article Type: Review Article
Keyword(s): epidemiology , GCC , Gulf cooperation council countries and measles elimination
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