1887
2 - International Conference in Emergency Medicine and Public Health-Qatar Proceedings
  • ISSN: 1999-7086
  • EISSN: 1999-7094

Abstract

Arterial punctures for monitoring respiratory problems are one of the most painful procedures in hospitalized patients. The knowledge regarding non-pharmacologic methods of pain management, including cold application is limited.

This aim of this study was to determine if the application of ice packs before the procedure would decrease the pain perception of patients during the arterial puncture.

This experimental study was undertaken among patients admitted to emergency ward in a public educational center affiliated to Ilam University of Medical Sciences, Ilam/Iran. Sixty-one eligible subjects were randomly assigned to two groups. The treatment group (n = 31) received ice packs before arterial puncture, whereas the control group (n = 30) received no intervention for pain management. Pain immediately and 5 minute after the arterial puncture were scored on a visual analog scale (VAS) from 0 to 10.

The mean of pain score immediately after the arterial puncture were 3.12 (1.68) and 4.6 (1.56) for treatment and control group, respectively (p < 0. 001). The mean pain score 5 minute after the punctures were 1.9 (1.51) for treatment group and 2.53 (1.85) for control group. This difference was not statistically significant. The mean of heart rate during the procedure were 75.45 (9.76) beats/min for the treatment subjects and 75.46 (9.36) beats/min for the control group (p>0.05). Patients with previous arterial puncture reported higher pain intensity.

Cold packs is a simple, non-invasive and inexpensive technique for pain management before the arterial puncture. However, there is a need for further research regarding this topic.

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/content/journals/10.5339/jemtac.2016.icepq.44
2016-10-09
2020-10-24
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  • Article Type: Research Article
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