1887
Volume 2016, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 1999-7086
  • E-ISSN: 1999-7094

Abstract

Globally, almost half of all adolescent deaths occur due to injury. Injuries related to accidental fall, being struck by an object or person, and road traffic injury (RTI) are particularly relevant among adolescents. Accidental falls and RTI are the most common causes of injury among children and adolescents. This study examines the profile of injuries among adolescents in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), including motor vehicle injuries (MVI), and identifies related factors associated with injury.

A cross-sectional study design determined incidence of injury for a sample of 6,363 adolescents aged 13 to 19 years. Data collected information on injury in the past 12 months, socio-demographic, behavioral, sensory data, and traffic-related behaviors. Logistic regression modeling was used to examine predictors of physical injury for the past 12 months, including injuries from motor vehicle collisions.

Among participants, 18% experienced injury; the three top causes include accidental falls (38%), being struck by an object or person (18%), and MVI (13%). Identified risk factors that are amenable for prevention include smoking behavior, exposure to smoking, physical activity profile, family income, and speeding behavior. In relation to MVI, significant predictors are attending private schools (OR = 2.58), physical activity (OR = 1.11), family income (OR = 16.25), and speeding (OR = 2.34). Additionally, expatriates were less likely to experience MVI than locals.

Our findings highlight the need for public health policies and education programs that reduce injury among the UAE adolescent population. Future studies should build upon these findings to plan and implement tailored injury prevention strategies for this sub-population.

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/content/journals/10.5339/jemtac.2016.icepq.39
2016-10-09
2019-11-22
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  • Article Type: Research Article
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