1887
2 - International Conference in Emergency Medicine and Public Health-Qatar Proceedings
  • ISSN: 1999-7086
  • EISSN: 1999-7094

Abstract

Tobacco consumption among youth is a growing public health concern worldwide. This paper examines the prevalence, profile, and predictors of tobacco-use among expatriate and national adolescents attending secondary schools in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Using a cross-sectional study design, we collected data on the prevalence of tobacco-use for a sample of 6,363 adolescents aged 13 to 20 years, including current smoking of cigarettes, midwakh, shisha, and any other form of tobacco. We also collected demographic, socioeconomic, residential, and behavioural data.

Results suggest that 8.9% of participants smoked cigarettes, 6.3% smoked midwakh, 7.4% smoked shisha, and 6.4% smoked any other form of tobacco in the past 30 days. Overall, 14.0% of adolescents were current smokers, defined as participants who reported occasional or daily use of at least one form of tobacco in the past 30 days. Results consistently indicate that the prevalence of tobacco use is higher among males than females, regardless of age and tobacco form. Among males, cigarette usage is the most popular whereas shisha is the most smoked tobacco form among females. Consistent predictors of tobacco smoking include being male, age, parents' marital status, ever using illegal drugs, exposure to smoking at home or with friends, ethnicity, and location of residence.

Findings of this study emphasize the need for continued public health strategies and education campaigns to discourage adolescents from using tobacco. Knowledge of predictors of tobacco-use can be used to target at-risk adolescents through various anti-tobacco use initiatives and tobacco control measures.

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/content/journals/10.5339/jemtac.2016.icepq.38
2016-10-09
2020-10-21
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http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.5339/jemtac.2016.icepq.38
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  • Article Type: Research Article
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