1887
Volume 2013, Issue 1
  • E-ISSN: 2223-506X

Abstract

Depression and obesity are common disorders. Obesity is also predictive of several chronic diseases like hypertension and diabetes. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare depression frequency of obese patients with hypertension or diabetes. Weight, height and body mass index (BMI) were measured. The definition of obesity was a body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)2) ≥ 30 kg/m2. Obese patients with hypertension or diabetes were documented. All participants had a Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) evaluation. A total of 389 subjects were included, of whom 100, 101, 92, 96 participants were healthy, obese, obese with hypertension, obese with diabetes, respectively. Beck Depression Inventory scores of obese patients, obese patients with hypertension or diabetes were higher compared to the control group. BDI scores of obese patients with diabetes were higher compared to obese and obese with hypertension subjects. Obesity is a risk for depression and other chronic diseases. Obesity can increase depressive symptoms. The level of depressive symptoms in obese patients varied according to chronic disease type. In the present study, diabetes appears to be more closely related to depression than hypertension.

: ANEAH.EK. 25.11.2010.47

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2013-06-01
2019-12-12
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): Depression , Diabetes , Hypertension and Obesity
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