1887
Volume 2013, Issue 1
  • EISSN: 2223-506X

Abstract

Minerals have a profound impact on reproduction. The relations between estradiol-17β (E) and blood mineral levels have been studied mainly in human and rats, but not in quail. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test the effect of E on serum mineral concentrations in Japanese quail (). The study was conducted at the Seljuk University animal farm thirteen week old female Japanese quails ( = 33) were housed in cages (25 × 35 × 48 cm) under a 16 hours light: 8 hours dark cycle. During the course of the study, birds were fed with a diet supplying 20% crude protein, 2901 kcal/kg metabolic energy, 2.5% calcium (Ca), 0.35% phosphorus (P), 1.02% lysine, 1.02% methionine and cysteine mixture. After a 7-day adaptation period, the birds were randomly assigned to 3 groups, one control ( = 10) and two others as test groups ( = 11 and  = 12). Birds in test groups were subcutaneously injected with 0.1 or 0.2 mg E. Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein and serum mineral concentrations were measured by HNO digestion method. Injection of 0.2 mg E resulted with a significant reduction in serum potassium concentration as compared to control group. Injection of 0.2 mg E caused a significant reduction in serum iron concentration as compared to 0.1 mg E injected group. Injection of 0.1 mg E caused a significant increase in serum chromium concentration over the control. Serum boron concentration was significantly high after the injection of 0.1 or 0.2 mg E over the control group. Effect of E on serum mineral concentration depends on injection dose. An injection of 0.1 or 0.2 mg E significantly increased serum boron concentration, which is an indication for the effect of E on bone mineralization and feed conversion ratio. Thus, administration of boron or E may protect postmenopausal women against osteoporosis and estradiol can be employed for the treatment of osteoporosis. Injection of 0.1 mg E caused a significant increase in serum chromium concentration, which indicates the function of E on body growth and reproductive performance. Injection of 0.2 mg E caused significant reduction in serum potassium (K) concentration, while there was a slight increase in serum sodium (Na) concentration. This indicates the involvement of E in rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system.

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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): aldosteron , estradiol , minerals , quail and serum
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