1887
Volume 2024, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 0253-8253
  • EISSN: 2227-0426

Abstract

Background: Myiasis is a neglected disease, characterized by ill-defined diagnostics and management protocols. Published epidemiological and clinical studies of myiasis are still scarce, although several countries, such as Oman, have reported a few cases over the past 30 years. This study explores the epidemiological profile and clinical characteristics of myiasis in South Batinah Governorate (SBG), Oman.

Methodology: A prospective surveillance study was conducted in SBG from 1st November 2018 to 31st October 2019. Clinical and epidemiological data were collected using a pre-designed reporting form for suspected and confirmed cases.

Results: A total of 188 cases were reported, of which 81.4% were male. One-third of cases were 11–20 years old, and a quarter reported exposure inside house. The rate of exposure was 16 per 10000 in Nakhal and Wadi Mawel. About 57% patients reported multiple re-exposure. Almost 60% of patients developed nasal or oral myiasis, 25% developed myiasis in the eye, and 4% in the ear. The most common respiratory symptoms were cough (83%), runny nose (48%), and foreign body sensation (35%). Over 50% of patients with eye exposures had redness, pain, and itchiness. Most patients (89.3%) kept animals at homes. Many cases occurred between December 2018 and April 2019, with almost one-third of exposures occurring at 5 p.m. Re-exposure likelihood for patients residing in Nakhal and Wadi Mawel was high; OR = 2.49 (95% CI 1.14–5.45), with OR = 3.59 (95% CI 1.37–9.39) for 11–20-year-olds and, OR = 3.01 (95% CI 1.07–8.42) for patients ≥ 31 years.

Conclusion: The myiasis exposure rate is high in certain areas and age groups, which is most likely associated with animal-related activities. The disease has a significant impact upon people’s health in SBG. Therefore, urgent active-surveillance and clinical studies are warranted to explore possible preventive measures and treatment options. Adopting one health approach could offer an effective strategy for preventing myiasis in human and animal populations.

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2024-03-14
2024-07-18
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): myiasisneglected diseaseOmanone healthsurveillance and zoonotic disease
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