1887
Volume 2022, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0253-8253
  • EISSN: 2227-0426

Abstract

Introduction: Severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARSCoV2) pandemic has been an unceasing plight with a wide range of clinical presentations. The direct effects of the virus, increased use of medications, and lifestyle changes have contributed to the vulnerability to co-infections. Fungal and bacterial co-infections led to increased morbidity and mortality during the pandemic. Similarly, the surge of skin signs in conjunction with herpes zoster (HZ) manifestations has been reported. In this study, we pooled the data on the clinical characteristics of SARS-CoV-2 patients co-infected with HZ.

Methodology: Electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar were extensively searched to identify the relevant studies on HZ infection among the SARS-CoV-2 patients.

Results: A total of 79 patients (from case reports, series, and retrospective studies) were included in the analysis. Fever was the most common constitutional symptom recorded, followed by cough and dyspnea. A systemic rash was reported in 78.5% of cases with mild symptoms of HZ and SARS-CoV-2 in 87% and 76%, respectively. Only 19% of the cases presented during the prodrome period of SARS-CoV-2. HZV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was positive in 8.9% of the cases, and the remaining were diagnosed clinically. SARS-CoV-2 PCR was reported positive in 65 cases (82.3%). Leukopenia was observed in 7 cases (8.9%) and lymphopenia in 25 (31.6%). All patients recovered through conservative treatment.

Conclusion: SARS-CoV-2 escalated the incidence of HZ reactivation. Most of the patients were seen with older individuals either simultaneously or a few days after the SARS-CoV-2 infection, but a few cases were reported during the asymptomatic prodrome period of SARS-CoV-2

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2022-09-01
2022-10-04
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  • Article Type: Review Article
Keyword(s): CoronavirusCOVID-19Herpes zosterSARS-CoV-2Varicella zoster virusvesicular rash and virus reactivation
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