1887
Volume 2022, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0253-8253
  • EISSN: 2227-0426

Abstract

Introduction: Healthcare research contributes to the well-being of a population; hence, it is important to use the right system to ensure that junior researchers develop the required skills. Current research-strengthening and capacity development programs might lack a research process-based common framework or model leading to variable and suboptimal outcomes. This study aimed to describe the development and evaluation of a model for health research-capacity development at both individual and institutional levels in a Joint Commission International-accredited governmental healthcare organization in Qatar.

Methods: This retrospective observational study evaluated a research support system employed in Qatar for 1 year and constituted of16 stations, each covering a different topic and supported by an experienced faculty member. We recorded how many faculty members were involved and how many people accessed which stations. We developed an outcomes logistic model and obtained feedback about their experience of using the research support system through a short survey.

Results: Twenty-one faculty members supported a total of 77 participants, representing various professions and specialties. The majority of the participants received support on multiple stations, and the most solicited were study design and methodology (n = 45, 58.4%) and research idea (n = 29, 37.7%). The most common type of research that participants required support for was clinical research (n = 65, 84.4%). Moreover, 58.4% of the participants answered the survey, and their responses attested to their perceived benefit of making use of the research support system.

Conclusion: The research support system presented was positively evaluated by participants and promoted networking. Such aspects are favorable to the development of a research culture within an organization and would be a good addition for implementation in universities running healthcare programs and hospitals with residency programs and a large and varied healthcare workforce. This would contribute to the development of health-related research capacity and quality of research outputs in these institutions.

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2022-08-05
2022-08-15
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): academic health systemCapacity buildingknowledge developmentmentoring and support
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