1887
Volume 2021, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0253-8253
  • EISSN: 2227-0426

Abstract

The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has imposed an unprecedented strain on healthcare systems worldwide. In response, psychiatrist trainees were redeployed from their training sites to help manage patients with COVID-19. This study aimed to examine the attitude of psychiatrist trainees toward redeployment to COVID-19 sites and their perceived preparedness for managing physical health conditions during redeployment. A cross-sectional researcher-developed online survey was administered among psychiatrist trainees in May 2020 at the Department of Psychiatry, Hamad Medical Corporation, Qatar. Of the 45 psychiatrist trainees, 40 (88.9%) responded to the survey. Most trainees reported being comfortable dealing with chronic medical conditions, but less so with acute life-threatening medical conditions. Half reported feeling anxious about redeployment, and most felt the need for additional training. We found that trainees’ perceived redeployment preparedness was significantly associated with their level of postgraduate training and the time since and duration of their last medical or surgical training. Adequate preparation and training of psychiatrist trainees is important before redeployment to COVID-19 sites to ensure that they can effectively and safely manage patients with COVID-19.

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2021-10-28
2021-12-05
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