1887
Volume 2021, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 0253-8253
  • EISSN: 2227-0426

Abstract

Background: A needlestick injury (NSI) is a serious occupational hazard among healthcare personnel (HCP), as it can cause transmission of blood-borne pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV). This study aimed to determine the frequency and distribution of reported NSIs, associated factors, use of post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), and percentage of seroconversion among HCP in a major tertiary care hospital in Qatar.

Methods: This retrospective study analyzed NSIs among HCP reported in Hamad Medical Corporation facilities in Doha between May 01, 2017, and May 01, 2018. A surveillance follow-up period of 6 months commenced after the 1-year study period.

Results: A total of 130 NSIs were reported during the study period, with an overall incidence of eight injuries per 1000 HCP. The mean age was 34.6 ± 7.9 years. Among the reported cases, the proportion of female HCP (n = 72, 55.4%) was greater than that of male HCP (n = 58, 44.6%). Of 130 NSIs, 79 (60.8%) occurred in nurses, followed by 35 (26.9%) cases in doctors and 16 (12.3%) in other HCP. The total healthcare population comprised 49.6% of nurses and 18% of doctors. NSIs occurred in 10.1 per 1000 nurses and in 12.4 per 1000 doctors. Exposures mainly occurred in the operating theater, 35 (31.5%); inpatient wards, 24 (21.6%); and emergency department, 20 (18%). Common modes of injury were after use or before disposal of the device in 44 (44.4%) cases and during surgical interventions in 35 (35.4%) cases. Hollow-bore needles (64/98, 65.3%) were the most common devices involved. Source serology was documented in 71 (54.6%) cases of which 52 (73.2%) were normal, 9 (12.7%) were abnormal, and 10 (14.1%) were incomplete. Among the exposed HCP, 124 (95.4%) had adequate immunity to HBV. PEP for HBV was indicated in 6 (4.6%) and received by 4 (3.1%) HCP. NSI cases were followed up for 6 months post-exposure, and during this surveillance period, no seroconversion to HBV, HCV, or HIV was detected.

Conclusion: NSIs are common among HCP. In this study, most of the exposed HCP had adequate immunity to HBV. There was no hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or HIV transmission among the study cohort. Adherence to proper needle/sharps disposal techniques and safe practices during procedures will help prevent NSIs.

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2021-09-16
2021-10-16
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