1887
Volume 2020, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0253-8253
  • EISSN: 2227-0426

Abstract

Introduction: The spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus has caused chaos around the world. At the onset of the virus’ detection in the State of Qatar, a free-testing system was rapidly established to invite individuals who had recently returned from countries with a COVID-19 disease travel warning to avoid putting other people at risk. The testing site needed to be accessible to individuals without requiring them to enter the hospital and congregate in a waiting area. The aim of this article is to share our experience with the early implementation of a drive-through testing clinic using the invited person's vehicle as an isolation compartment during screening to minimize person-to-person contamination.

Methods: A Hamad Medical Corporation site was selected to stage a drive-through testing facility to avoid congestion and offer space to facilitate the process. A process was rapidly agreed upon, and staff received the required training regarding infection control measures and documentation. At the testing site, individuals were subjected to the following steps: registration and history taking, temperature measurement, swabbing, and receipt of a sick leave certificate and a flyer about self-quarantine.

Results: Over the first six days of implementation, the relevant authorities determined that 687 individuals had to be contacted, 103 attended their testing appointment in that period, and an additional 327 people (close relations of the individuals contacted or individuals contacted but without a health card) also subjected themselves to the testing process, which took a median time of 11 minutes 39 seconds. No individual exhibited symptoms that warranted immediate isolation while they were at the drive-through testing clinic. However, four individuals were diagnosed with COVID-19 following laboratory analysis of the swab taken and followed up. The median time between swab collection and laboratory testing was 13 hours 41 minutes 59 seconds.

Conclusions: Collaboration among various key health, governmental, and travel industry partners was essential to the successful and rapid implementation of a COVID-19 drive-through testing clinic in the early days of the pandemic in Qatar. The general public reacted well to this process. Communication, coordination, and planning were identified as critical factors at every step of the process. It started from the initial call to the travelers who had recently returned from a country with a newly instituted travel warning and concluded by them leaving with their sick leave certificate and an information flyer with reminders about preventative infection control measures and encouraging them to self-quarantine after having been swabbed.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.5339/qmj.2020.42
2021-02-15
2021-08-04
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/qmj/2020/3/qmj.2020.42.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.5339/qmj.2020.42&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Phelanr AL, Katzr R, Gostin LO. The novel coronavirus originating in Wuhan, China: challenges for global health governance. Jama. 2020; 323: 70910.
    [Google Scholar]
  2. WHO. WHO Director-General's opening remarks at the media briefing on COVID-19 - 9 March 2020. World Health Organization, [cited 2020 March 10] Available from: https://www.who.int/director-general/speeches/detail/who-director-general-s-opening-remarks-at-the-media-briefing-on-covid-19–-9-march-2020 .
  3. Selvey LA, Antão C, Hall R. Evaluation of border entry screening for infectious diseases in humans. Emerging infectious diseases. 2015; 21: 197.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. MoPH. Spread of Coronavirus Disease 2019 Remains Low in Qatar??.News Details - 8/03/2020: Ministry of Public Health, Doha, Qatar, [cited 2020 March 9] Available from: https://www.moph.gov.qa/english/mediacenter/News/Pages/NewsDetails.aspx?ItemId = 93 .
  5. WHO. Updated WHO recommendations for international traffic in relation to COVID-19 outbreak. 29 February 2020 COVID-19 Travel Advice: World Health Organization, [cited 2020 March 10] Available from: https://www.who.int/news-room/articles-detail/updated-who-recommendations-for-international-traffic-in-relation-to-covid-19-outbreak .
  6. Tanne JH, Hayasaki E, Zastrow M, Pulla P, Smith P, Rada AG. Covid-19: how doctors and healthcare systems are tackling coronavirus worldwide. BMJ. 2020; 368.
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Gengler J, Al-Khelaifi B. Crisis, State Legitimacy, and Political Participation in a Non-Democracy: How Qatar Withstood the 2017 Blockade. Middle East J. 2019; 73: 397416.
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Gangaram P, Menacho AM, Alinier G. Crisis resource management in relation to empowering people to speak up in emergency medical service clinical practice settings. Journal of Paramedic Practice. 2017; 9: 605.
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Goodman A. The development of the Qatar Healthcare System: A review of the literature. International Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2015; 6: 17785.
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Kwon KT, Ko J-H, Shin H, Sung M, Kim JY. Drive-Through Screening Center for COVID-19: a Safe and Efficient Screening System against Massive Community Outbreak. Journal of Korean Medical Science. 2020; 35.
    [Google Scholar]
  11. El-Kassem RC, Al-Kubaisi AS, Al Naimi MM, Al-Hamadi AM, Al-Rakeb NA. Path Analytic Investigation of the Intention to Adopt E-government Services through Mobile Applications in Qatar (Tam Revisited). International Journal of Advanced Research in Engineering and Technology. 2020; 11.
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Weiss EA, Ngo J, Gilbert GH, Quinn JV. Drive-through medicine: a novel proposal for rapid evaluation of patients during an influenza pandemic. Annals of emergency medicine. 2010; 55: 26873.
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Caswell A. The Impact of MERS-Cov: Service and Systems Re-design: The Creation of the Caswell–Hijazi Model. American Journal of Nursing. 2019; 8: 20615.
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Kucharski AJ, Klepac P, Conlan AJK, et al. Effectiveness of isolation, testing, contact tracing, and physical distancing on reducing transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in different settings: a mathematical modelling study. The Lancet Infectious Diseases. 2020; 20: 115160.
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.5339/qmj.2020.42
Loading
/content/journals/10.5339/qmj.2020.42
Loading

Data & Media loading...

  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): COVID-19 , drive-through testing , infectious disease , pandemic and quarantine
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error