1887
Volume 2016, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 0253-8253
  • E-ISSN: 2227-0426

Abstract

Standard Emergency Department (ED) operations goals include minimization of the time interval (tMD) between patients' initial ED presentation and initial physician evaluation. This study assessed factors known (or suspected) to influence tMD with a two-step goal. The first step was generation of a multivariate model identifying parameters associated with prolongation of tMD at a single study center. The second step was the use of a study center-specific multivariate tMD model as a basis for predictive marginal probability analysis; the marginal model allowed for prediction of the degree of ED operations benefit that would be affected with specific ED operations improvements. The study was conducted using one month (May 2015) of data obtained from an ED administrative database (EDAD) in an urban academic tertiary ED with an annual census of approximately 500,000; during the study month, the ED saw 39,593 cases. The EDAD data were used to generate a multivariate linear regression model assessing the various demographic and operational covariates' effects on the dependent variable tMD. Predictive marginal probability analysis was used to calculate the relative contributions of key covariates as well as demonstrate the likely tMD impact on modifying those covariates with operational improvements. Analyses were conducted with Stata 14MP, with significance defined at  < 0.05 and confidence intervals (CIs) reported at the 95% level. In an acceptable linear regression model that accounted for just over half of the overall variance in tMD (adjusted 2 0.51), important contributors to tMD included shift census ( = 0.008), shift time of day ( = 0.002), and physician coverage ( = 0.004). These strong associations remained even after adjusting for each other and other covariates. Marginal predictive probability analysis was used to predict the overall tMD impact (improvement from 50 to 43 minutes,  < 0.001) of consistent staffing with 22 physicians. The analysis identified expected variables contributing to tMD with regression demonstrating significance and effect magnitude of alterations in covariates including patient census, shift time of day, and number of physicians. Marginal analysis provided operationally useful demonstration of the need to adjust physician coverage numbers, prompting changes at the study ED. The methods used in this analysis may prove useful in other EDs wishing to analyze operations information with the goal of predicting which interventions may have the most benefit.

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2017-02-24
2019-08-22
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): ED operations data , ED physicians , Emergency Department and Qatar
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