1887
Volume 2012, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 0253-8253
  • E-ISSN: 2227-0426

Abstract

A cross-sectional stratified cluster sample of 4291 children (2187 boys and 2104 girls) aged 6 to18 years attending primary public schools in Qatar was used to determine the prevalence of underweight, overweight and obesity among primary school children in Qatar using BMI as an indicator. Structured questionnaires were used to obtain socio-demographic data. Anthropometric measures were taken by trained nurse. The study revealed a high prevalence of underweight and obesity among Qatari children, with both conditions implicating adverse short and long-term health effects. The prevalence of underweight (BMI <  5% of CDC standard for ageand sex) was 14.6%, overweight (BMI 85% to 95%) was 11.6% and obesity (BMI > 95%) was 14.7% (95% confidence level). The prevalence of overweight and obesity was higher in girls (28.7%) than boys (24%) but was similar in Qatari (26.4%) and non-Qatari children (26.2%). The prevalence of both underweight (15.6%) and obesity (15.8%) were considerably higher in Qatari children.

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2012-06-01
2019-11-12
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): BMI , Obesity , overweight , pediatrics , Qatar and underweight
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