1887
Volume 2011, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 0253-8253
  • E-ISSN: 2227-0426

Abstract

Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic illness that requires continuous medical care. Patient health education and self-management aim to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk of long-term complications. Care of diabetic patients is a complex process and requires many issues beyond glycemic control. This study is conducted to assess quality of care of diabetic patients in the diabetic clinic at Al Wakra Healthcare Center and to determine some factors that may affect the quality of this care.

Methodology: This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study. The target population was all diabetic patients (Type 2) that meet the inclusion criteria and registered at the center. Two checklists assessed the structure of diabetic care; the first checklist is for the essential items of care (thirteen items) and the second one is for the less essential items (ten items). The indicators of the process of diabetic care was assessed by a scoring system that depends on ten items for standard diabetic care by the primary care physicians in the past year. Assessment of the outcome was done according to an international quality assurance protocol and it includes: the degree of diabetic control, obesity, smoking among the diabetic patients and control of blood pressure. We added HbA1c to this list. Another questionnaire was designed to determine factors that may affect quality of diabetic care-related to patient's knowledge and attitude and it is divided into 4 sections: personal data, patient knowledge about diabetes, patient attitude toward care and clinical and biochemical assessments. A pilot study was carried out to test the questionnaires. Epi-info. Six statistical package was used for data entry and statistical analysis. Chi square or Fisher exact tests were used to test the significance, and P value <  0.05 was considered significant.

Results: The study showed that diabetic care at Primary Healthcare Centers (PHC) in Qatar represented by Al Wakra Primary Healthcare Center is better when compared to the care in other studies in different countries. 86.7% of physicians show that most of the structure items are good to fair except for the absence of chiropodist and identification cards for diabetic patients. Assessment of the process of care showed that there is good to fair recording in 91.75% of cases; foot examination is not recorded in most of cases; and fundus examination is not recorded in 31.7%. The outcome indicators showed that patient knowledge about diabetes is poor in 35% of cases, uncontrolled FBS in 75.6% of cases, uncontrolled HbA1 c in 57.8%; obesity in 63.5% and control of blood pressure is not achieved in 49% of cases.

Conclusion: Diabetic Clinic at Al Wakra Primary Healthcare Center provides good care for diabetic patients in terms of structure, process and outcome; however, more efforts are needed for refining these services.

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