1887
Volume 2023, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 1999-7086
  • EISSN: 1999-7094

Abstract

The body of evidence on surgical intensive care unit (SICU) mortality and its predictors is still being determined. This study analyzed the significant predicting factors for mortality in SICU patients.

The medical records of patients in SICUs at Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn Medical Center, Srinakharinwirot University, from June 2020 to July 2021, were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were excluded if transferred from other hospitals and not undergoing orthopedics, otolaryngology, obstetrics, and gynecology surgeries.

A total of 276 patients admitted to SICUs were included in this analysis, and 60.5% were men. The mean age was 60.07 ± 17.19 years. The average length of SICU stay was 8.1 ± 10.79 days, and the mortality rate was 23.6%. By univariate analysis, significant predictive factors for mortality rate in SICU patients were acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) ( < 0.001), Glasgow coma scale (GCS) ≤ 8 ( < 0.001), sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score ( < 0.001), serum albumin < 2.5 ( = 0.013), and sepsis or septic shock ( < 0.001). From receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis to predict mortality, the best cut-off point of APACHE II and SOFA scores were 15.5 and 5.5, respectively. The multivariate logistic regression analysis significantly identified APACHE II > 15, GCS ≤ 8 and SOFA score > 5 as significant predictive factors associated with the mortality rate in SICU patients.

APACHE II > 15, GCS ≤ 8, and SOFA score > 5 are predictive mortality factors in SICU patients. Patients with these factors should be given priority for admission to the SICU when there is a discrepancy between the demand and the supply for SICU beds.

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2023-06-28
2024-06-14
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