1887
Volume 2021, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 1999-7086
  • EISSN: 1999-7094

Abstract

BRCA2 genes are not only found in humans, but in other animal species. BRCA2 gene plays a vital role in maintaining the stability of a cell's genetic information. BRCA2 is considered as a gatekeeper gene; however, if mutated or abnormally expressed, it causes the destruction of normal cell structure and promotes the growth of cancer cells. This study aimed to assess the differences and similarities of BRCA2 gene from different animal species in Africa through genomics analysis providing further insight on its comparative genomics features. Fifteen nucleotide sequences of BRCA2 gene of different mammals and bird species were retrieved from National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). Multiple sequence alignment was done with MEGA 7.0 software, while identity and similarities were determined by constructing a pairwise comparison. Conserved domains on the sequences were identified with NCB1-CDD. BRCA2 gene was found to be present not only in humans, but other lower animals and birds across African countries. The phylogenetic tree for BRCA2 gene in Tunisia belongs to the same ecological niche with the BRCA2 gene in Ethiopia and BRCA2 from the same African region has high bootstrap, implying that they share the same homology. Conserved regions identified in the all the sequences were absent in and most present in , , , , , , , and . Based on the findings obtained from this study, BRCA2 gene in humans and other lower animals, particularly from same region, share the same homology and similarities.

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2021-07-26
2021-09-20
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