1887
Volume 2015, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 1999-7086
  • E-ISSN: 1999-7094

Abstract

The objective of this study was to assess the current numbers-based model of evaluation of emergency medicine residents in emergency ultrasound, specifically by focusing on the proficiency of residents to interpret right upper quadrant, focused abdominal sonogram for trauma, abdominal aorta, first trimester pregnancy, and cardiac scans. A prospective analysis of emergency medicine residents' competency in emergency ultrasound was conducted in 2009 and 2010. Residents completed a multiple choice style examination primarily assessing residents' diagnostic accuracy. The accuracy and confidence of diagnosis for each resident based on the examinations were compared to his/her training level and number of scans per application completed prior to testing, in order to assess the relationship of experience to competence. Thirty-six emergency medicine residents, postgraduate year 1–3 (n = 15, 8, 13), were enrolled in the study and took the exam. There was a statistically significant relationship between the number of scans and mean exam score for right upper quadrant (p = 0.0013) and abdominal aorta (p = 0.0013) scans. Residents demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in scores at greater than 16 scans for right upper quadrant (p = 0.0018) and 13 scans for abdominal aorta (p = 0.0018). Adequate resident training for interpretation for certain applications such as right upper quadrant and abdominal aorta, may be achievable using smaller numbers than the generally accepted guideline of 25 scans per application. Additionally, the number of scans needed to reach competency may be variable dependent on the specific ultrasound application.

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2015-04-16
2019-11-17
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): accuracy , competency , confidence , resident , training standard and ultrasound education
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