1887
Volume 2022, Issue 2
  • EISSN: 2220-2749

Abstract

Hepatitis infections, particularly hepatitis B and C, threaten public health to a great extent. They can be directly transferred from pregnant women to their fetuses, either in utero or postpartum. In Saudi Arabia, there is a variation in the prevalence of both infections among women throughout the country’s regions. Thus, it is necessary to examine women for probable infections by any of these types of hepatitis to prevent hepatitis transmission.

To assess the prevalence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections among women in Ha’il, Saudi Arabia during 2016-2020.

A retrospective cohort study was performed on the cumulative sero-prevalence of hepatitis B and C among 23,462 women who attended the maternity hospital in Ha’il, Kingdom Saudi Arabia (KSA), from the period of 2016-2020.

The analysis revealed that the hepatitis B infection (sero-prevalence 0.27%; 64 cases) is more prevalent than hepatitis C infection (sero-prevalence 0.077%, 18 cases) among women. Both infections were higher among Saudi compared to non-Saudi nationals. Moreover, hepatitis B sero-prevalence increases with women’s age, while HCVAb was higher in the group 40 – <50 years old. The data also showed no trends throughout months, seasons, and years for HCVAb and HBsAg cases. Conclusion: The results show a dramatic decline in both types of hepatitis (B and C) among the investigated women compared to previous and recent reports from other regions in the country and a further decrease in the prevalence during the study period. These results imply that the hepatitis B vaccination program implemented in Ha’il over the last 30 years has been successful for females. Therefore, surveillance, improved diagnostic facilities, and vaccination efforts should be continued in Ha’il, KSA.

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2022-11-17
2022-12-03
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