1887
Volume 2021, Issue 2
  • ISSN: 2220-2749
  • EISSN:

Abstract

The Corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic poses a risk of inequality between the number of prepared service staff and patients. Emergency hospitals, that do not have full-time employees due to the voluntary employment system, need to supervise the competence and knowledge of their staff, as they came with diverse backgrounds of knowledge and skill. The National Emergency Hospital Wisma Atlet Kemayoran, which can provide services for nearly 6000 COVID-19 patients, is required to be able to provide education and training continuously to improve the knowledge of its volunteers aiming to improve the quality of the care services.

The present study is descriptive observational research to explore the challenge of education and training in the COVID-19 National Emergency Hospital Wisma Atlet Kemayoran in Jakarta.

The COVID-19 health workers need to be equipped with sufficient knowledge about personal protective equipment (PPE), COVID-19 management, triage, admission, emergency and critical care for the COVID-19 patients. Supervision is needed to ensure that volunteers with various knowledge and skill backgrounds can collaboratively provide good services for the COVID-19 patients at all fronts. With frequent personnel changes, education and training on the same topic are always given repeatedly. To overcome this inefficiency, the Education and Training Department can film every practical skill related to health care service, and then create tutorial videos followed by small groups onsite skill station, when necessary. The hospital received enormous support from the governmental and non- governmental organizations to conduct education and training sessions on regular basis.

Education and training are very critical in the Emergency COVID-19 Hospital. The process has become a major challenge due to regular changes of staff. Information and communication technologies remain a more recommended alternative to the traditional onsite face-to-face method of education and training delivery as to prevent the spread of this virus. The training and education program in the National COVID-19 Emergency Hospital Wisma Atlet have received major supports from several Government agencies, and national private/non-government organizations. However, supports from International NGOs, international aid agencies, or humanitarian organizations, apart from the local professional organizations, which generally extend generous support need also to be explored.

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2021-10-10
2021-12-02
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  • Article Type: Research Article
Keyword(s): COVID-19 , education and training , emergency hospital , Indonesia and volunteer
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