1887

oa Basrah

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Figures

2010
    ▸  Area: 181 km ▸  Population: 3,500,000 ▸  Density: 19,337/km
1940
    ▸  4.9 km ▸  Population: 93,000 approx. ▸  Density: 18,976/km
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FIGURE 8.5 Each column represents one day, each cell represents one hour
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IMAGE 8.1 Ashar Creek, Basrah
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FIGURE 8.9 The past-to-present transitional period for Basrah in Iraq is identified from the mid-1940s to the late 1950s, when a series of key events occurred in the city. In 1930, the ownership of Basrah port and custom duties was transferred from Britain to the Iraqi government, coinciding with the first commercial extraction of oil for Iraq. Equally during the 1930s, the first elementary and secondary schools were opened in the city, and the first commercial telephone services were established. In 1938, the Basrah Petroleum Company was founded, and the first Friday mosque was built with funds from oil revenues. The first city expansion plan to densify the area between the historic core and the banks of the Shatt Al-Arab was undertaken in 1940. Major increases in oil extraction and oil revenue per capita, as well as number of people living in the city, were observed in the same decade. It has to be noted, though, that the transitional period from the 1930s to 1940s was primarily socioeconomic; major infrastructure works did not take place in Basrah until the 1970s. There were major demolitions in 1971 to make way for a modern roadway network, completion of significant housing projects, and the commencement of the destruction of the marshlands. The majority of these developments can be safely associated with the discovery and extraction of oil in the surroundings of Basrah city, which happened during the peak years of oil prices. One other major factor to explain the slowdown in development from the 1940s to the 1970s is the Second World War.
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IMAGE 8.2 Dates being packed and bundled for export
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IMAGE 8.3 Reed house typology in the marshes to the south
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IMAGE 8.4 Waterfront for Shatt Al-Arab at Ashar
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IMAGE 8.5 Baazar Square, Basrah
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IMAGE 8.6 Traditional building, Basrah
IMAGE 8.7 Carved gypsum trough from Uruk Two lambs exit a reed structure identical to the present-day mudhif on this ceremonial trough from the site of Uruk in southern Iraq- Sumerian, c. 3000 bce, British Museum
IMAGE 8.8 Aerial view of a Ma’dan floating village near Nasiriya
IMAGE 8.9 A Ma’dan village
IMAGE 8.10 Among the Muntifiq
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