1887
Volume 2022, Issue 4
  • ISSN: 0253-8253
  • EISSN: 2227-0426

Abstract

Background: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had consequences on the pregnant population, as disease severity is associated with the quality of maternal health and pregnancy complications, increasing maternal and neonatal morbidity. Worldwide descriptive data help describe risk factors that could predict symptomatic and severe COVID-19 in pregnancy.

Objectives: To describe demographic features and risk factors of pregnant women with COVID-19 in Qatar and compare symptomatic versus asymptomatic disease.

Study design and methodology: Clinical characteristics and risk factors of pregnant women with COVID-19 in Qatar from March 2020 to March 2021 was retrospectively reviewed, comparing the cohort with the general pregnant population. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (aORs) were computed, comparing symptomatic versus asymptomatic infection.

Results: Of the 500 women, 347 reported at least one symptom at diagnosis (347/500; 69.4%). The majority fell in the 30–39 years age group (241/500; 48%), with more than half in the obese body mass index (BMI) category. The cohort was 66% (332/500) Qatari women, compared with the 26% expected in the population (26.4% vs 66.4%  < 0.001). Compared with the 2019 national statistics, the number of women was higher in the >40 years age group (5% vs 7.6%,  = 0.027) and grand multiparous group (5.4% vs 13.6%,  < 0.001). The symptom most commonly reported by the symptomatic group was cough (276/500; 55%), followed by fever, fatigue, and myalgia. In the adjusted analysis, the symptomatic group had 2.7 times higher odds of being asthmatic (OR = 2.67, 95% CI 1.1–6.7,  = 0.037). Women aged >40 years had 6.6 times higher odds of symptomatic disease (aOR = 6.6, 95% CI 1.08–39.73,  = 0.041). A history of contact with a patient with symptomatic COVID and earlier gestational age at diagnosis increased the odds (aOR = 2.06, 95% CI 1.2–3.54,  = 0.009; aOR = 0.73 95% CI 0.57–0.96;  = 0.017).

Conclusions: This study cohort included significantly more Qatari women, older women, grand multiparous women, a higher proportion with pre-existing and gestational diabetes, and higher BMI than national data. In addition, contact to a patient with symptomatic disease, history of asthma, older age, and earlier gestational age at diagnosis were significantly associated with symptomatic disease.

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2022-11-15
2022-12-07
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