1887
Volume 2022, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0253-8253
  • EISSN: 2227-0426

Abstract

Background: Treatment options for patients with critical Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) are limited. This study aimed to describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes associated with remdesivir therapy in patients with COVID-19 who require non-invasive (NIV) ventilation or invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV).

Methods: Data were retrospectively extracted for adults with COVID-19 confirmed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) between August 1, 2020 and January 28, 2021 who received ≥ 48 hours of remdesivir therapy while on NIV or IMV. Clinical improvement was defined as two-category improvement on an eight-point ordinal severity scale.

Results: A total of 133 individuals were included, of which 114 (85.7%) were on NIV and 19 (14.3%) were on IMV at the time of remdesivir initiation. The majority of the patients were males (62.4%), and the median age was 56 years. All the patients received concomitant dexamethasone therapy. Remdesivir treatment was commenced after a median of 7 days from onset of symptoms and was continued for a median of 5 days.

Clinical improvement within 28 days was achieved in 101 patients (75.9%); among which, 78.1% and 63.2% were subjected to baseline NIV and IMV, respectively. Among the 11 (8.3%) patients who died of any cause by day 28, 9 (7.9%) and 2 (10.5%) were subjected to baseline NIV and IMV, respectively. The most frequent adverse events were sinus bradycardia (21, 13.1%) and alanine transaminase increase (18, 11.3%). Almost all adverse events were classified as Grades 1–3.

Conclusion: The use of remdesivir in combination with systemic corticosteroids is associated with high recovery rates and low all-cause mortality in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia who require NIV or IMV. The results need confirmation from clinical trials of appropriate design and size.

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2022-06-16
2022-08-10
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  • Article Type: Short Communication
Keyword(s): bradycardiacoronavirusintensive care unitmechanical ventilationremdesivir and severe pneumonia
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