1887
Volume 2019, Issue 3
  • ISSN: 0253-8253
  • EISSN: 2227-0426

Abstract

Problem-based learning (PBL) is an inquiry-based learning strategy which is learner centered and facilitates group discussion and critical thinking. Case-based learning (CBL), which is a more guided approach of PBL, enables students to learn within the context of patients and formulate their knowledge around patients' scenarios. Midweek (MW) activity is an important educational activity in the internal medicine residency program (IMRP). CBL has shown many benefits in postgraduate education. The aim of our study was to describe the implementation of a teaching resident's management of acute medical conditions encountered during their call utilizing the CBL format and to evaluate resident satisfaction with the new teaching style. This study describes the implementation of CBL in residents' education at the IMRP. CBL was introduced in five of the 10 acute medical sessions taught in the noon activity. A mixed-method study was employed using both a structured questionnaire and a focus group to compare the two methods to evaluate the residents' satisfaction and perception of knowledge acquisition. The focus group discussion showed that sessions conducted in CBL format were more engaging, interactive, and resulted in better knowledge acquisition through sharing and peer-to-peer teaching than the traditional lecture format. Thirty-nine out of 83 (47%) residents ranging from PGY2 to PGY4 responded to the survey. Overall satisfaction with CBL was good. Sixty-four percent preferred it over the lecture format; 87% found that they did improve their knowledge; 84% agreed that they were excellent and more interactive. Seventy-nine percent stated that they would like to have this type of teaching in the MW activity sessions. Based on the present study, we conclude that incorporation of CBL resulted in more engagement, interaction, peer-to-peer education, and overall residents' satisfaction. The key elements for a successful implementation of this format are both instructors' and residents' orientation and careful selection of the case scenarios (problems) that trigger the learning process. Incorporation of various teaching strategies in residents' education is mandatory to enhance learning and create excellent educational experiences.

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2019-12-17
2020-07-08
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