1887
Volume 2014, Issue 1
  • ISSN: 2311-8148
  • E-ISSN:
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Abstract

The objective of this paper is to describe and explain the extremely high usage of Twitter within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. This topic relates strongly to the current transformations that Saudi society is undergoing, and helps to demonstrate the growing desire of the youth to express their opinions in the public sphere via social media. Although the government has attempted to censor Twitter and hold individual users accountable, in addition to legislation further criminalizing speech against the state, it has become clear that regulating the Twittersphere is incredibly difficult. Consequently, in recent years, the regime has taken a different approach and attempted to engage with the population via Twitter, creating accounts for ministries, high-profile princes, and other officials. While Twitter is commonly used to criticize the monarchy in Riyadh and explore taboo subjects, such as the right of women to drive, Saudis are also using it to defend conservative values and support the preservation of traditions. This forum is providing Saudis with access to lively and engaging debates in a way that was not previously possible.

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2014-06-20
2019-12-13
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